They May Not Mean To, But They Do

28312641_10156416298193392_2096433629_oThey May Not Mean To, But They Do by Cathleen Shcine

At the beginning of this novel, Joy Bergman is the caregiver to her husband Aaron, whose health is failing quickly. It isn’t long before Joy begins having some issues with aging herself. Much to her dismay, her two children, Molly and Daniel are full of ideas and solutions to deal with Joy’s aging and loneliness. She loses sleep worrying that they may send her to a nursing home.

Joy has begun to feel “out of date, obsolete, and left-behind,” and useless to anyone. She wants to take care of everything herself, but is beginning to realize that she may not be able to do that anymore. “She mourned her husband. She mourned her life. She longed for her children and husband. She didn’t seem to belong anywhere anymore.”

The title of Cathleen Schine’s novel comes from a poem by Philip Larkin which begins “They fuck you up, your mum and dad / They may not mean to, but they do.” Later in the book, Joy says,” They meant well. They did. But they fuck you up, your son and daugther. They may not mean to but they do.”  She says this about her children interfering in her life, making decisions for her and trying to control what she does.

This book will be very true to life to anyone that has dealt aging or caring for an aging parent. The book is set in New York and I really enjoyed reading about the city as well. At times it was heart-breaking, but at the same time, the author lightened up the book a little bit with scattered dry humor. I laughed out loud many times reading Joy’s observations and thoughts about family and life. This book is an emotional exploration about aging, grief and dysfunctional families. The author really hit the nail on the head.

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